Partial subsidy

Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Let f = 0.8 and G = 0.05.  Write a simplified form of the formula for the braking distance d using these values for the two variables.  Your formula should involve the remaining variable V.

d =

Do not round the value in the denominator.  If you have trouble, you will get a hint after two attempts.

While the original equation involved four variables, this simplified formula just involves two, allowing us to compare how changing the initial velocity changes braking distance.

#4 Points possible: 16. Total attempts: 5

For each of the velocities in the table, given in miles per hour, first convert them to feet per second.  Then, use your simplified formula from above to determine the braking distance.  Give answers to two decimal places.

Velocity (miles/hr) Velocity (ft/sec) Braking Distance (ft)
10
20
40
80

#5 Points possible: 12. Total attempts: 5

Suppose the speed doubles from 10mph to 20mph.  Complete the two sentences below, giving answers to one decimal place.

The braking distance at 20mph is  ft longer than the braking distance at 10mph

The braking distance at 20mph is  times as long as the braking distance at 10mph

 

Suppose the speed doubles from 40mph to 80mph.  Complete the two sentences below, giving answers to one decimal place.

The braking distance at 80mph is  ft longer than the braking distance at 40mph

The braking distance at 80mph is  times as long as the braking distance at 40mph

 

#6 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Now we can return to a question we asked you to make a prediction about earlier.

Based on the pattern from your calculations, what will happen to braking distance if you were to double the speed of the car before it applies the brakes?

· The braking distance would be shorter

· The braking distance would be the same

· The braking distance would be twice as long

· The braking distance would be three times as long

· The braking distance would be four times as long

· The braking distance would be five times as long

#7 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Now try to extend that idea to answer to complete the sentence below.

If the speed were to triple, the braking distance would be  times as long

#8 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Plot the data from your table of values you calculated earlier, with velocity in miles per hour on the horizontal axis, and braking distance on the vertical axis.

 

Clear All Draw: Dot

#9 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

What best describes the shape of the graph of the data?

· Linear – line shaped

· Curving upwards

#10 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Look at your simplified formula from earlier.  What family of equations does this formula belong to?

· Linear

· Exponential

· Quadratic

· None of these

HW 4.5

#1 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Which of the following was one of the main mathematical ideas of the lesson?

· Braking distance is affected by many factors.

· When using variables, it is only important to know what numbers to substitute in for them.

· When using variables, it is important to know what they represent and what units should be used with them.

· A subscript is a label on a variable.

#2 Points possible: 12. Total attempts: 5

In the lesson, you investigated the relationship between velocity and braking distance. You will now investigate the relationship between the coefficient of friction and the braking distance. Recall that the formula for the braking distance of a car is d=V22g(f+G)d=V22g(f+G)

a. Which of the variables in the formula represents a constant?

· f

· d

· V

· G

· g

b. To investigate the relationship between the coefficient of friction and the braking distance, you need to hold the other variables fixed. Let G = 0.02. Which of the following is a correct interpretation of the value G = 0.02?

· The grade of a road is 2%, which is a vertical increase of 2 feet for every 1 foot of horizontal increase.

· The grade of a road is 0.02%, which is a vertical increase of 0.02 feet for every 1 foot of horizontal increase.

· The grade of a road is 2%, which is a vertical increase of 2 feet for every 100 feet of horizontal increase.

· The grade of a road is 0.02%, which is a vertical increase of 0.02 feet for every 100 feet of horizontal increase.

c. Let V = 72 mph and use the value of G in Part (b). Which of the following expressions represents the simplified form of the formula using these values?

· d=11,151.3664.4f+1.288 ftd=11,151.3664.4f+1.288 ft

· d=11,151.3664.4f+8,657.89 ftd=11,151.3664.4f+8,657.89 ft

· d=11,151.3664.4f+0.02 ftd=11,151.3664.4f+0.02 ft

#3 Points possible: 18. Total attempts: 5

Use the formula you found in part c of the previous question.

a. Create a table of values for f and d (in feet). Use the values of given in the table. Perform one of the calculations on paper showing the units. You may then use technology to complete the table.  Round answers to the nearest tenth.

f d (feet)
0.30
0.50
0.70
0.90

b.

c. The four values of f correspond to the coefficient of friction for four road conditions:  an icy road, a very good road with great tires, an asphalt road with fair tires, and a wet road with fair tires.  Match the coefficients of friction to the appropriate conditions by looking at the braking distance required.

i. Icy road, f =

ii. Very good road with great tires, f =

iii. Asphalt road with fair tires, f =

iv. Wet road with fair tires, f =

d. In the table, the coefficient of friction, f, is increasing at a constant rate, since each value is 0.2 more than the previous value.  How is d changing as f increases at a constant rate?

. The stopping distance is decreasing

. The stopping distance is constant

. The stopping distance is increasing

#4 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

In statistics, the formula E=1.96⋅√ˆp(1−ˆp)nE=1.96⋅p^(1-p^)n is used to calculate the margin of error E (at a 95% confidence level) for a survey of n people where ˆpp^  is the proportion of the people who responded a particular way.

In a particular survey of 1300 people, the proportion who favored stiffer penalties for drunk driving was 71%, so ˆp=0.71p^=0.71 .  Determine the margin of error, E.  Report the answer rounded to 3 decimal places.

Margin of error:

#5 Points possible: 20. Total attempts: 5

Newton’s law of gravitational force (measured in Newtons) between two objects r meters apart with masses m1 kilograms and m2 kilograms is given by the formula F=Gm1m2r2F=Gm1m2r2 , where G is a constant approximately equal to 6.674×10−116.674×10-11 .  The earth and the moon are about 384,000 kilometers apart.  The mass of the moon is about 73,480,000,000,000,000,000,000 kg, and the mass of the earth is about 5,972,200,000,000,000,000,000,000 kg.

a. The size of the numbers in this question make them hard to work with.  Rewrite them using scientific notation.  Don’t forget to check the units, and make any necessary conversions. The distance between the earth and the moon:       meters Mass of the moon:       kilograms Mass of the earth:       kilograms

b. Calculate the gravitational force.  Give your answer in scientific notation.   Note: Since the number 384,000 only has three significant digits (numbers before trailing zeros), it is appropriate to round your final answer so that it also has three significant digits (2 decimal places, in scientific notation).     Newtons

#6 Points possible: 20. Total attempts: 5

The tuition at a daycare center is based on family income.  A reduced tuition has a subsidy.  There are three levels of tuition:

· Full subsidy – the family does not pay any tuition

· Partial subsidy – the family pays part of the tuition

· No subsidy – the family pays the full tuition

The data for the daycare center, showing how many students there are for each age level and tuition level, is given below.  Answer the questions below. Round to the nearest whole percent.

    Tuition Level  
    Full Subsidy Partial Subsidy No Subsidy Total
Age  Level 3 year-olds 17 13 8
4 year-olds 22 14 15
5 year-olds 15 16 11
  Total

a. Complete the last column and last row.

b. What percentage of 3 year-olds received a full or partial subsidy?   %

c. What percentage of those who receive no subsidy are 5 years old?   %

d. What percentage of the students are 3 years old?   %

e. The daycare center’s funding for one term comes from federal funding for the subsidy and the tuition paid by families based on the formula below.  Find the funding for the center.

· Funding = 1,530F + 1,750P + 1,875N where

· F = number of children receiving a full subsidy

· P = number of children receiving a partial subsidy

· = number of children receiving no subsidy Funding for the center = $

#7 Points possible: 10. Total attempts: 5

In Lesson 2.1, you used a formula that was written as steps in a form to calculate taxes for different people.  Formulas are often written in this way.  One example is the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) Formula, which is used to determine if a college student is eligible for financial aid.  The EFC has many different sections that each use different calculations.  One section of the 2010-11 form is shown below.

Student’s Contribution from Assets
Cash, savings, and checking    
Net worth of investments +  
Net worth of business and/or investment farm +  
Net worth (sum of lines 45 through 47)    
Assessment rate × 0.20
Students Contribution from Assets =  

 

a. Calculate the Student’s Contribution from Assets given the following information, to the nearest dollar. Cash:  $500 Savings:  $1,240 Investments: $0 Business:  $0 Checking:  $732 Student’s Contribution from Assets:  $

b. Write a formula (equation) that summarizes the calculation in this form using the following variables: C = Cash including savings and checking Ni = Net worth of investment Nb = Net worth of business or farm S = Student’s contribution from assets

Exponential

Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Let f = 0.8 and G = 0.05.  Write a simplified form of the formula for the braking distance d using these values for the two variables.  Your formula should involve the remaining variable V.

d =

Do not round the value in the denominator.  If you have trouble, you will get a hint after two attempts.

While the original equation involved four variables, this simplified formula just involves two, allowing us to compare how changing the initial velocity changes braking distance.

#4 Points possible: 16. Total attempts: 5

For each of the velocities in the table, given in miles per hour, first convert them to feet per second.  Then, use your simplified formula from above to determine the braking distance.  Give answers to two decimal places.

Velocity (miles/hr) Velocity (ft/sec) Braking Distance (ft)
10
20
40
80

#5 Points possible: 12. Total attempts: 5

Suppose the speed doubles from 10mph to 20mph.  Complete the two sentences below, giving answers to one decimal place.

The braking distance at 20mph is  ft longer than the braking distance at 10mph

The braking distance at 20mph is  times as long as the braking distance at 10mph

 

Suppose the speed doubles from 40mph to 80mph.  Complete the two sentences below, giving answers to one decimal place.

The braking distance at 80mph is  ft longer than the braking distance at 40mph

The braking distance at 80mph is  times as long as the braking distance at 40mph

 

#6 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Now we can return to a question we asked you to make a prediction about earlier.

Based on the pattern from your calculations, what will happen to braking distance if you were to double the speed of the car before it applies the brakes?

· The braking distance would be shorter

· The braking distance would be the same

· The braking distance would be twice as long

· The braking distance would be three times as long

· The braking distance would be four times as long

· The braking distance would be five times as long

#7 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Now try to extend that idea to answer to complete the sentence below.

If the speed were to triple, the braking distance would be  times as long

#8 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Plot the data from your table of values you calculated earlier, with velocity in miles per hour on the horizontal axis, and braking distance on the vertical axis.

 

Clear All Draw: Dot

#9 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

What best describes the shape of the graph of the data?

· Linear – line shaped

· Curving upwards

#10 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Look at your simplified formula from earlier.  What family of equations does this formula belong to?

· Linear

· Exponential

· Quadratic

· None of these

HW 4.5

#1 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Which of the following was one of the main mathematical ideas of the lesson?

· Braking distance is affected by many factors.

· When using variables, it is only important to know what numbers to substitute in for them.

· When using variables, it is important to know what they represent and what units should be used with them.

· A subscript is a label on a variable.

#2 Points possible: 12. Total attempts: 5

In the lesson, you investigated the relationship between velocity and braking distance. You will now investigate the relationship between the coefficient of friction and the braking distance. Recall that the formula for the braking distance of a car is d=V22g(f+G)d=V22g(f+G)

a. Which of the variables in the formula represents a constant?

· f

· d

· V

· G

· g

b. To investigate the relationship between the coefficient of friction and the braking distance, you need to hold the other variables fixed. Let G = 0.02. Which of the following is a correct interpretation of the value G = 0.02?

· The grade of a road is 2%, which is a vertical increase of 2 feet for every 1 foot of horizontal increase.

· The grade of a road is 0.02%, which is a vertical increase of 0.02 feet for every 1 foot of horizontal increase.

· The grade of a road is 2%, which is a vertical increase of 2 feet for every 100 feet of horizontal increase.

· The grade of a road is 0.02%, which is a vertical increase of 0.02 feet for every 100 feet of horizontal increase.

c. Let V = 72 mph and use the value of G in Part (b). Which of the following expressions represents the simplified form of the formula using these values?

· d=11,151.3664.4f+1.288 ftd=11,151.3664.4f+1.288 ft

· d=11,151.3664.4f+8,657.89 ftd=11,151.3664.4f+8,657.89 ft

· d=11,151.3664.4f+0.02 ftd=11,151.3664.4f+0.02 ft

#3 Points possible: 18. Total attempts: 5

Use the formula you found in part c of the previous question.

a. Create a table of values for f and d (in feet). Use the values of given in the table. Perform one of the calculations on paper showing the units. You may then use technology to complete the table.  Round answers to the nearest tenth.

f d (feet)
0.30
0.50
0.70
0.90

b.

c. The four values of f correspond to the coefficient of friction for four road conditions:  an icy road, a very good road with great tires, an asphalt road with fair tires, and a wet road with fair tires.  Match the coefficients of friction to the appropriate conditions by looking at the braking distance required.

i. Icy road, f =

ii. Very good road with great tires, f =

iii. Asphalt road with fair tires, f =

iv. Wet road with fair tires, f =

d. In the table, the coefficient of friction, f, is increasing at a constant rate, since each value is 0.2 more than the previous value.  How is d changing as f increases at a constant rate?

. The stopping distance is decreasing

. The stopping distance is constant

. The stopping distance is increasing

#4 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

In statistics, the formula E=1.96⋅√ˆp(1−ˆp)nE=1.96⋅p^(1-p^)n is used to calculate the margin of error E (at a 95% confidence level) for a survey of n people where ˆpp^  is the proportion of the people who responded a particular way.

In a particular survey of 1300 people, the proportion who favored stiffer penalties for drunk driving was 71%, so ˆp=0.71p^=0.71 .  Determine the margin of error, E.  Report the answer rounded to 3 decimal places.

Margin of error:

#5 Points possible: 20. Total attempts: 5

Newton’s law of gravitational force (measured in Newtons) between two objects r meters apart with masses m1 kilograms and m2 kilograms is given by the formula F=Gm1m2r2F=Gm1m2r2 , where G is a constant approximately equal to 6.674×10−116.674×10-11 .  The earth and the moon are about 384,000 kilometers apart.  The mass of the moon is about 73,480,000,000,000,000,000,000 kg, and the mass of the earth is about 5,972,200,000,000,000,000,000,000 kg.

a. The size of the numbers in this question make them hard to work with.  Rewrite them using scientific notation.  Don’t forget to check the units, and make any necessary conversions. The distance between the earth and the moon:       meters Mass of the moon:       kilograms Mass of the earth:       kilograms

b. Calculate the gravitational force.  Give your answer in scientific notation.   Note: Since the number 384,000 only has three significant digits (numbers before trailing zeros), it is appropriate to round your final answer so that it also has three significant digits (2 decimal places, in scientific notation).     Newtons

#6 Points possible: 20. Total attempts: 5

The tuition at a daycare center is based on family income.  A reduced tuition has a subsidy.  There are three levels of tuition:

· Full subsidy – the family does not pay any tuition

· Partial subsidy – the family pays part of the tuition

· No subsidy – the family pays the full tuition

The data for the daycare center, showing how many students there are for each age level and tuition level, is given below.  Answer the questions below. Round to the nearest whole percent.

    Tuition Level  
    Full Subsidy Partial Subsidy No Subsidy Total
Age  Level 3 year-olds 17 13 8
4 year-olds 22 14 15
5 year-olds 15 16 11
  Total

a. Complete the last column and last row.

b. What percentage of 3 year-olds received a full or partial subsidy?   %

c. What percentage of those who receive no subsidy are 5 years old?   %

d. What percentage of the students are 3 years old?   %

e. The daycare center’s funding for one term comes from federal funding for the subsidy and the tuition paid by families based on the formula below.  Find the funding for the center.

· Funding = 1,530F + 1,750P + 1,875N where

· F = number of children receiving a full subsidy

· P = number of children receiving a partial subsidy

· = number of children receiving no subsidy Funding for the center = $

#7 Points possible: 10. Total attempts: 5

In Lesson 2.1, you used a formula that was written as steps in a form to calculate taxes for different people.  Formulas are often written in this way.  One example is the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) Formula, which is used to determine if a college student is eligible for financial aid.  The EFC has many different sections that each use different calculations.  One section of the 2010-11 form is shown below.

Student’s Contribution from Assets
Cash, savings, and checking    
Net worth of investments +  
Net worth of business and/or investment farm +  
Net worth (sum of lines 45 through 47)    
Assessment rate × 0.20
Students Contribution from Assets =  

 

a. Calculate the Student’s Contribution from Assets given the following information, to the nearest dollar. Cash:  $500 Savings:  $1,240 Investments: $0 Business:  $0 Checking:  $732 Student’s Contribution from Assets:  $

b. Write a formula (equation) that summarizes the calculation in this form using the following variables: C = Cash including savings and checking Ni = Net worth of investment Nb = Net worth of business or farm S = Student’s contribution from assets

coefficient of friction

Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Let f = 0.8 and G = 0.05.  Write a simplified form of the formula for the braking distance d using these values for the two variables.  Your formula should involve the remaining variable V.

d =

Do not round the value in the denominator.  If you have trouble, you will get a hint after two attempts.

While the original equation involved four variables, this simplified formula just involves two, allowing us to compare how changing the initial velocity changes braking distance.

#4 Points possible: 16. Total attempts: 5

For each of the velocities in the table, given in miles per hour, first convert them to feet per second.  Then, use your simplified formula from above to determine the braking distance.  Give answers to two decimal places.

Velocity (miles/hr) Velocity (ft/sec) Braking Distance (ft)
10
20
40
80

#5 Points possible: 12. Total attempts: 5

Suppose the speed doubles from 10mph to 20mph.  Complete the two sentences below, giving answers to one decimal place.

The braking distance at 20mph is  ft longer than the braking distance at 10mph

The braking distance at 20mph is  times as long as the braking distance at 10mph

 

Suppose the speed doubles from 40mph to 80mph.  Complete the two sentences below, giving answers to one decimal place.

The braking distance at 80mph is  ft longer than the braking distance at 40mph

The braking distance at 80mph is  times as long as the braking distance at 40mph

 

#6 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Now we can return to a question we asked you to make a prediction about earlier.

Based on the pattern from your calculations, what will happen to braking distance if you were to double the speed of the car before it applies the brakes?

· The braking distance would be shorter

· The braking distance would be the same

· The braking distance would be twice as long

· The braking distance would be three times as long

· The braking distance would be four times as long

· The braking distance would be five times as long

#7 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Now try to extend that idea to answer to complete the sentence below.

If the speed were to triple, the braking distance would be  times as long

#8 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Plot the data from your table of values you calculated earlier, with velocity in miles per hour on the horizontal axis, and braking distance on the vertical axis.

 

Clear All Draw: Dot

#9 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

What best describes the shape of the graph of the data?

· Linear – line shaped

· Curving upwards

#10 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Look at your simplified formula from earlier.  What family of equations does this formula belong to?

· Linear

· Exponential

· Quadratic

· None of these

HW 4.5

#1 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

Which of the following was one of the main mathematical ideas of the lesson?

· Braking distance is affected by many factors.

· When using variables, it is only important to know what numbers to substitute in for them.

· When using variables, it is important to know what they represent and what units should be used with them.

· A subscript is a label on a variable.

#2 Points possible: 12. Total attempts: 5

In the lesson, you investigated the relationship between velocity and braking distance. You will now investigate the relationship between the coefficient of friction and the braking distance. Recall that the formula for the braking distance of a car is d=V22g(f+G)d=V22g(f+G)

a. Which of the variables in the formula represents a constant?

· f

· d

· V

· G

· g

b. To investigate the relationship between the coefficient of friction and the braking distance, you need to hold the other variables fixed. Let G = 0.02. Which of the following is a correct interpretation of the value G = 0.02?

· The grade of a road is 2%, which is a vertical increase of 2 feet for every 1 foot of horizontal increase.

· The grade of a road is 0.02%, which is a vertical increase of 0.02 feet for every 1 foot of horizontal increase.

· The grade of a road is 2%, which is a vertical increase of 2 feet for every 100 feet of horizontal increase.

· The grade of a road is 0.02%, which is a vertical increase of 0.02 feet for every 100 feet of horizontal increase.

c. Let V = 72 mph and use the value of G in Part (b). Which of the following expressions represents the simplified form of the formula using these values?

· d=11,151.3664.4f+1.288 ftd=11,151.3664.4f+1.288 ft

· d=11,151.3664.4f+8,657.89 ftd=11,151.3664.4f+8,657.89 ft

· d=11,151.3664.4f+0.02 ftd=11,151.3664.4f+0.02 ft

#3 Points possible: 18. Total attempts: 5

Use the formula you found in part c of the previous question.

a. Create a table of values for f and d (in feet). Use the values of given in the table. Perform one of the calculations on paper showing the units. You may then use technology to complete the table.  Round answers to the nearest tenth.

f d (feet)
0.30
0.50
0.70
0.90

b.

c. The four values of f correspond to the coefficient of friction for four road conditions:  an icy road, a very good road with great tires, an asphalt road with fair tires, and a wet road with fair tires.  Match the coefficients of friction to the appropriate conditions by looking at the braking distance required.

i. Icy road, f =

ii. Very good road with great tires, f =

iii. Asphalt road with fair tires, f =

iv. Wet road with fair tires, f =

d. In the table, the coefficient of friction, f, is increasing at a constant rate, since each value is 0.2 more than the previous value.  How is d changing as f increases at a constant rate?

. The stopping distance is decreasing

. The stopping distance is constant

. The stopping distance is increasing

#4 Points possible: 5. Total attempts: 5

In statistics, the formula E=1.96⋅√ˆp(1−ˆp)nE=1.96⋅p^(1-p^)n is used to calculate the margin of error E (at a 95% confidence level) for a survey of n people where ˆpp^  is the proportion of the people who responded a particular way.

In a particular survey of 1300 people, the proportion who favored stiffer penalties for drunk driving was 71%, so ˆp=0.71p^=0.71 .  Determine the margin of error, E.  Report the answer rounded to 3 decimal places.

Margin of error:

#5 Points possible: 20. Total attempts: 5

Newton’s law of gravitational force (measured in Newtons) between two objects r meters apart with masses m1 kilograms and m2 kilograms is given by the formula F=Gm1m2r2F=Gm1m2r2 , where G is a constant approximately equal to 6.674×10−116.674×10-11 .  The earth and the moon are about 384,000 kilometers apart.  The mass of the moon is about 73,480,000,000,000,000,000,000 kg, and the mass of the earth is about 5,972,200,000,000,000,000,000,000 kg.

a. The size of the numbers in this question make them hard to work with.  Rewrite them using scientific notation.  Don’t forget to check the units, and make any necessary conversions. The distance between the earth and the moon:       meters Mass of the moon:       kilograms Mass of the earth:       kilograms

b. Calculate the gravitational force.  Give your answer in scientific notation.   Note: Since the number 384,000 only has three significant digits (numbers before trailing zeros), it is appropriate to round your final answer so that it also has three significant digits (2 decimal places, in scientific notation).     Newtons

#6 Points possible: 20. Total attempts: 5

The tuition at a daycare center is based on family income.  A reduced tuition has a subsidy.  There are three levels of tuition:

· Full subsidy – the family does not pay any tuition

· Partial subsidy – the family pays part of the tuition

· No subsidy – the family pays the full tuition

The data for the daycare center, showing how many students there are for each age level and tuition level, is given below.  Answer the questions below. Round to the nearest whole percent.

    Tuition Level  
    Full Subsidy Partial Subsidy No Subsidy Total
Age  Level 3 year-olds 17 13 8
4 year-olds 22 14 15
5 year-olds 15 16 11
  Total

a. Complete the last column and last row.

b. What percentage of 3 year-olds received a full or partial subsidy?   %

c. What percentage of those who receive no subsidy are 5 years old?   %

d. What percentage of the students are 3 years old?   %

e. The daycare center’s funding for one term comes from federal funding for the subsidy and the tuition paid by families based on the formula below.  Find the funding for the center.

· Funding = 1,530F + 1,750P + 1,875N where

· F = number of children receiving a full subsidy

· P = number of children receiving a partial subsidy

· = number of children receiving no subsidy Funding for the center = $

#7 Points possible: 10. Total attempts: 5

In Lesson 2.1, you used a formula that was written as steps in a form to calculate taxes for different people.  Formulas are often written in this way.  One example is the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) Formula, which is used to determine if a college student is eligible for financial aid.  The EFC has many different sections that each use different calculations.  One section of the 2010-11 form is shown below.

Student’s Contribution from Assets
Cash, savings, and checking    
Net worth of investments +  
Net worth of business and/or investment farm +  
Net worth (sum of lines 45 through 47)    
Assessment rate × 0.20
Students Contribution from Assets =  

 

a. Calculate the Student’s Contribution from Assets given the following information, to the nearest dollar. Cash:  $500 Savings:  $1,240 Investments: $0 Business:  $0 Checking:  $732 Student’s Contribution from Assets:  $

b. Write a formula (equation) that summarizes the calculation in this form using the following variables: C = Cash including savings and checking Ni = Net worth of investment Nb = Net worth of business or farm S = Student’s contribution from assets

exploration and problem solving.

Select a grade level 3-5 and a corresponding standard from the “Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Content on Numbers and Operations: Fractions” to develop a complete lesson plan.

Using the “COE Lesson Plan Template,” align one or more NCTM Process standards with your learning target. Use the “Class Profile” to design an activity supported by the recommendations in the IES report to teach that target.

Develop differentiated activities for the students in the “Class Profile” identified as below grade level, at grade-level, and above grade-level that

Choose one of the following:

  1. Use models in fraction tasks, including area, length, and set/quantity models.
  2. Emphasize academic language, including partitioning, sharing tasks, and iterating
  3. Explore equivalent fractions.

Find technology that would engage and support students who are below grade level, at grade level, and above grade level. Elaborate on this technology in the Instructional Materials, Equipment, and Technology portion of the “COE Lesson Plan Template.”

In the “Teacher Notes” section, use the online resource, “Promoting Mathematical Thinking and Discussion with Effective Questioning Strategies,” and the IES report to help identify and describe five potential issues or roadblocks that might happen while delivering the lesson and provide possible solutions to the potential issues.

In addition to your lesson, draft 10 questions that you would ask during your lesson that incorporate the following:

  • Promote conceptual understandings related to fractions for students whose performance are below grade level, at grade level, and above grade level.
  • Identify potential student misconceptions that could interfere with learning.
  • Create experiences to build accurate conceptual understanding.
  • Activate prior knowledge.
  • Connect concepts, procedures, and applications.
  • Encourage exploration and problem solving.

Submit the completed lesson plan and your questions as one deliverable.

While APA style format is not required for the body of this assignment, solid academic writing is expected, and in-text citations and references should be presented using APA documentation guidelines, which can be found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center.

This assignment uses a rubric. Review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

You are required to submit this assignment to Turnitin.

Activate prior knowledge.

Select a grade level 3-5 and a corresponding standard from the “Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Content on Numbers and Operations: Fractions” to develop a complete lesson plan.

Using the “COE Lesson Plan Template,” align one or more NCTM Process standards with your learning target. Use the “Class Profile” to design an activity supported by the recommendations in the IES report to teach that target.

Develop differentiated activities for the students in the “Class Profile” identified as below grade level, at grade-level, and above grade-level that

Choose one of the following:

  1. Use models in fraction tasks, including area, length, and set/quantity models.
  2. Emphasize academic language, including partitioning, sharing tasks, and iterating
  3. Explore equivalent fractions.

Find technology that would engage and support students who are below grade level, at grade level, and above grade level. Elaborate on this technology in the Instructional Materials, Equipment, and Technology portion of the “COE Lesson Plan Template.”

In the “Teacher Notes” section, use the online resource, “Promoting Mathematical Thinking and Discussion with Effective Questioning Strategies,” and the IES report to help identify and describe five potential issues or roadblocks that might happen while delivering the lesson and provide possible solutions to the potential issues.

In addition to your lesson, draft 10 questions that you would ask during your lesson that incorporate the following:

  • Promote conceptual understandings related to fractions for students whose performance are below grade level, at grade level, and above grade level.
  • Identify potential student misconceptions that could interfere with learning.
  • Create experiences to build accurate conceptual understanding.
  • Activate prior knowledge.
  • Connect concepts, procedures, and applications.
  • Encourage exploration and problem solving.

Submit the completed lesson plan and your questions as one deliverable.

While APA style format is not required for the body of this assignment, solid academic writing is expected, and in-text citations and references should be presented using APA documentation guidelines, which can be found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center.

This assignment uses a rubric. Review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

You are required to submit this assignment to Turnitin.

student misconceptions

Select a grade level 3-5 and a corresponding standard from the “Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Content on Numbers and Operations: Fractions” to develop a complete lesson plan.

Using the “COE Lesson Plan Template,” align one or more NCTM Process standards with your learning target. Use the “Class Profile” to design an activity supported by the recommendations in the IES report to teach that target.

Develop differentiated activities for the students in the “Class Profile” identified as below grade level, at grade-level, and above grade-level that

Choose one of the following:

  1. Use models in fraction tasks, including area, length, and set/quantity models.
  2. Emphasize academic language, including partitioning, sharing tasks, and iterating
  3. Explore equivalent fractions.

Find technology that would engage and support students who are below grade level, at grade level, and above grade level. Elaborate on this technology in the Instructional Materials, Equipment, and Technology portion of the “COE Lesson Plan Template.”

In the “Teacher Notes” section, use the online resource, “Promoting Mathematical Thinking and Discussion with Effective Questioning Strategies,” and the IES report to help identify and describe five potential issues or roadblocks that might happen while delivering the lesson and provide possible solutions to the potential issues.

In addition to your lesson, draft 10 questions that you would ask during your lesson that incorporate the following:

  • Promote conceptual understandings related to fractions for students whose performance are below grade level, at grade level, and above grade level.
  • Identify potential student misconceptions that could interfere with learning.
  • Create experiences to build accurate conceptual understanding.
  • Activate prior knowledge.
  • Connect concepts, procedures, and applications.
  • Encourage exploration and problem solving.

Submit the completed lesson plan and your questions as one deliverable.

While APA style format is not required for the body of this assignment, solid academic writing is expected, and in-text citations and references should be presented using APA documentation guidelines, which can be found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center.

This assignment uses a rubric. Review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

You are required to submit this assignment to Turnitin.

critical value method and p-value method.

BA 275 Comprehensive Project

Summer 2018

Project Idea: Using one data set (all major airline domestic flights departing from Oregon airports in 2016), you will use all the tools we learn in this class. The point of any statistics class (including this one!) is to better understand the world through data. Although we have many tools, all of them come back to one question: “How can we better understand our data?” In order to really understand these tools, we will repeatedly ask the question, “what patterns can we find in this Oregon flight data?”

Project Procedure: Each week, you will be asked to use a different tool or approach on this same data. Each week you will add a new section to an ongoing project report. By the end of the course, you will have used every tool we have to better understand this data.

Project Data: the data is available on Canvas. If you want to check it for yourself, it’s available for free download here: https://www.transtats.bts.gov/DataIndex.asp

You may find the “glossary” to be of help in decoding the meanings of some of what you read: https://www.transtats.bts.gov/glossary.asp

Week 2: In class this week we’ve learned about “margins of error” and “confidence intervals”, which allow us to estimate not just quantities we care about but also our level of uncertainty about those quantities.

Additionally, we’ve learned about “hypothesis testing”, which allow us to answer yes/no questions with a certain confidence.

1) Open your data in Excel and answer the following in complete sentences.

a) Explain why this data is a population, rather than a sample. Remember that we can generally describe a population using a phrase like, “this is a list of all of ___________.”

b) Like last time, we’ll calculate confidence intervals using random samples of this data. Choose 3 sets of 30 rows at random (it’s fine to use the same random 30 rows you picked last week). After finding their average, calculate a 90% confidence interval for each sample of 30 for the average flight departure delay, being sure to show your work clearly. How many of the three confidence intervals captured the true mean?

Hint 1: Excel’s =randbetween(2,4863) will make picking a random row easy, if you didn’t do that last week.

Hint 2: If you’re using Word, Insert>Equation will make your life easier as you show your work! (Alt+= is the shortcut for inserting equations)

2) Let’s use this data to conduct a hypothesis test Write your claim: you might want to start, “I’m testing the claim that the average delay of a flight departing {airport in Oregon} is less than _____________.” Don’t forget units of time! This means that your:

Null hypothesis:

and the Alternative hypothesis:

a) Set your significance level: alpha = ____%.

b) Like last time, we’ll calculate hypothesis tests using random samples of this data. Choose 30 rows at random (it’s fine to use one of the 30 samples from earlier in this project.). Now rather than finding a confidence interval, calculate a hypothesis test using the equation

You must use both critical value method and p-value method. Do both methods lead to the same conclusion?

hypothesis tests using random samples

BA 275 Comprehensive Project

Summer 2018

Project Idea: Using one data set (all major airline domestic flights departing from Oregon airports in 2016), you will use all the tools we learn in this class. The point of any statistics class (including this one!) is to better understand the world through data. Although we have many tools, all of them come back to one question: “How can we better understand our data?” In order to really understand these tools, we will repeatedly ask the question, “what patterns can we find in this Oregon flight data?”

Project Procedure: Each week, you will be asked to use a different tool or approach on this same data. Each week you will add a new section to an ongoing project report. By the end of the course, you will have used every tool we have to better understand this data.

Project Data: the data is available on Canvas. If you want to check it for yourself, it’s available for free download here: https://www.transtats.bts.gov/DataIndex.asp

You may find the “glossary” to be of help in decoding the meanings of some of what you read: https://www.transtats.bts.gov/glossary.asp

Week 2: In class this week we’ve learned about “margins of error” and “confidence intervals”, which allow us to estimate not just quantities we care about but also our level of uncertainty about those quantities.

Additionally, we’ve learned about “hypothesis testing”, which allow us to answer yes/no questions with a certain confidence.

1) Open your data in Excel and answer the following in complete sentences.

a) Explain why this data is a population, rather than a sample. Remember that we can generally describe a population using a phrase like, “this is a list of all of ___________.”

b) Like last time, we’ll calculate confidence intervals using random samples of this data. Choose 3 sets of 30 rows at random (it’s fine to use the same random 30 rows you picked last week). After finding their average, calculate a 90% confidence interval for each sample of 30 for the average flight departure delay, being sure to show your work clearly. How many of the three confidence intervals captured the true mean?

Hint 1: Excel’s =randbetween(2,4863) will make picking a random row easy, if you didn’t do that last week.

Hint 2: If you’re using Word, Insert>Equation will make your life easier as you show your work! (Alt+= is the shortcut for inserting equations)

2) Let’s use this data to conduct a hypothesis test Write your claim: you might want to start, “I’m testing the claim that the average delay of a flight departing {airport in Oregon} is less than _____________.” Don’t forget units of time! This means that your:

Null hypothesis:

and the Alternative hypothesis:

a) Set your significance level: alpha = ____%.

b) Like last time, we’ll calculate hypothesis tests using random samples of this data. Choose 30 rows at random (it’s fine to use one of the 30 samples from earlier in this project.). Now rather than finding a confidence interval, calculate a hypothesis test using the equation

You must use both critical value method and p-value method. Do both methods lead to the same conclusion?

Explain why this data is a population, rather than a sample. Remember that we can generally describe a population using a phrase like, “this is a list of all of

BA 275 Comprehensive Project

Summer 2018

Project Idea: Using one data set (all major airline domestic flights departing from Oregon airports in 2016), you will use all the tools we learn in this class. The point of any statistics class (including this one!) is to better understand the world through data. Although we have many tools, all of them come back to one question: “How can we better understand our data?” In order to really understand these tools, we will repeatedly ask the question, “what patterns can we find in this Oregon flight data?”

Project Procedure: Each week, you will be asked to use a different tool or approach on this same data. Each week you will add a new section to an ongoing project report. By the end of the course, you will have used every tool we have to better understand this data.

Project Data: the data is available on Canvas. If you want to check it for yourself, it’s available for free download here: https://www.transtats.bts.gov/DataIndex.asp

You may find the “glossary” to be of help in decoding the meanings of some of what you read: https://www.transtats.bts.gov/glossary.asp

Week 2: In class this week we’ve learned about “margins of error” and “confidence intervals”, which allow us to estimate not just quantities we care about but also our level of uncertainty about those quantities.

Additionally, we’ve learned about “hypothesis testing”, which allow us to answer yes/no questions with a certain confidence.

1) Open your data in Excel and answer the following in complete sentences.

a) Explain why this data is a population, rather than a sample. Remember that we can generally describe a population using a phrase like, “this is a list of all of ___________.”

b) Like last time, we’ll calculate confidence intervals using random samples of this data. Choose 3 sets of 30 rows at random (it’s fine to use the same random 30 rows you picked last week). After finding their average, calculate a 90% confidence interval for each sample of 30 for the average flight departure delay, being sure to show your work clearly. How many of the three confidence intervals captured the true mean?

Hint 1: Excel’s =randbetween(2,4863) will make picking a random row easy, if you didn’t do that last week.

Hint 2: If you’re using Word, Insert>Equation will make your life easier as you show your work! (Alt+= is the shortcut for inserting equations)

2) Let’s use this data to conduct a hypothesis test Write your claim: you might want to start, “I’m testing the claim that the average delay of a flight departing {airport in Oregon} is less than _____________.” Don’t forget units of time! This means that your:

Null hypothesis:

and the Alternative hypothesis:

a) Set your significance level: alpha = ____%.

b) Like last time, we’ll calculate hypothesis tests using random samples of this data. Choose 30 rows at random (it’s fine to use one of the 30 samples from earlier in this project.). Now rather than finding a confidence interval, calculate a hypothesis test using the equation

You must use both critical value method and p-value method. Do both methods lead to the same conclusion?

Let’s use this data to conduct a hypothesis test Write your claim: you might want to start, “I’m testing the claim that the average delay of a flight departing {airport in Oregon} is less than _____________.” Don’t forget units of time! This means that your:

BA 275 Comprehensive Project

Summer 2018

Project Idea: Using one data set (all major airline domestic flights departing from Oregon airports in 2016), you will use all the tools we learn in this class. The point of any statistics class (including this one!) is to better understand the world through data. Although we have many tools, all of them come back to one question: “How can we better understand our data?” In order to really understand these tools, we will repeatedly ask the question, “what patterns can we find in this Oregon flight data?”

Project Procedure: Each week, you will be asked to use a different tool or approach on this same data. Each week you will add a new section to an ongoing project report. By the end of the course, you will have used every tool we have to better understand this data.

Project Data: the data is available on Canvas. If you want to check it for yourself, it’s available for free download here: https://www.transtats.bts.gov/DataIndex.asp

You may find the “glossary” to be of help in decoding the meanings of some of what you read: https://www.transtats.bts.gov/glossary.asp

Week 2: In class this week we’ve learned about “margins of error” and “confidence intervals”, which allow us to estimate not just quantities we care about but also our level of uncertainty about those quantities.

Additionally, we’ve learned about “hypothesis testing”, which allow us to answer yes/no questions with a certain confidence.

1) Open your data in Excel and answer the following in complete sentences.

a) Explain why this data is a population, rather than a sample. Remember that we can generally describe a population using a phrase like, “this is a list of all of ___________.”

b) Like last time, we’ll calculate confidence intervals using random samples of this data. Choose 3 sets of 30 rows at random (it’s fine to use the same random 30 rows you picked last week). After finding their average, calculate a 90% confidence interval for each sample of 30 for the average flight departure delay, being sure to show your work clearly. How many of the three confidence intervals captured the true mean?

Hint 1: Excel’s =randbetween(2,4863) will make picking a random row easy, if you didn’t do that last week.

Hint 2: If you’re using Word, Insert>Equation will make your life easier as you show your work! (Alt+= is the shortcut for inserting equations)

2) Let’s use this data to conduct a hypothesis test Write your claim: you might want to start, “I’m testing the claim that the average delay of a flight departing {airport in Oregon} is less than _____________.” Don’t forget units of time! This means that your:

Null hypothesis:

and the Alternative hypothesis:

a) Set your significance level: alpha = ____%.

b) Like last time, we’ll calculate hypothesis tests using random samples of this data. Choose 30 rows at random (it’s fine to use one of the 30 samples from earlier in this project.). Now rather than finding a confidence interval, calculate a hypothesis test using the equation

You must use both critical value method and p-value method. Do both methods lead to the same conclusion?